Where East Meets West – Part 4

As I continue my wanderings across the county, I’m finding places, and exploring the wolds far more than perhaps I would have done without any incentive.  It is very pleasant to just ramble about the countryside with an aim in mind, and trying to keep track of where I’ve been, and where I’m going.  There are not many days when the combination of the right light, and freedom to wander combine, but when they do it’s great.

The intention is to try and keep something like on the meridian line, but I’m also trying to include a good area on either side of it.  I’m sure as I head further South, and finally leave the wolds, there will be more towns and villages to explore.  For this post though, it’s churches……. and some odd teapots..

Meandering a little further South than Louth – I came into Burwell, where there were lovely views of the wolds, and then the road ran back down onto the A16 – as an aside – I came back this way the other day, and the farmer is putting a strong fence line on the right hand side of this picture, so I won’t get this shot again!

Down on the main A16 can be found the Buttercross – a Grade II listed building since 1967. The buttercross was built in c1700 and converted into a dovecote in the mid 1800s, and following further changes became the village hall at Burwell. It’s now empty and boarded up.  It was up for sale, and in fact the sale board is still there, propped against the doorway.  The pub next door is also closed now.

I think the buttercross must have been a medieval market at one time, and all the sides would have been open.  It has incredibly atrractive brickwork.

Next came the tiny parish of Haugham – and the spectactular stained glass window in All Saints Church.

Entering the building and seeing this bronze coloured window was quite a surpise, but sadly it looks like the left hand pane has been broken.  The light was gorgeous, and the colours intense.

The outside of the building, as you can see was rather like a miniature version of St James Church in Louth.

Further on, we came across this – looking rather like a gibbet, but with some strange decorations….

A strange collection of what looks like teapots, morph, fungii, and Eeyore ….

Next – I stumbled upon what was described as Lincolnshire’s smallest Church – that of St Olave in Ruckland.

St Olave’s church is one of Lincolnshire’s smallest churches and it is dedicated to St Olave (Olaf) who was of Norwegian royal blood, the son of King Herald and queen Aasta. Ruckland is the only church in Lincolnshire dedicated to him.

You can find out more about St Olaf by clicking this link

The church on this site previously measured 31ft long and 17ft wide but by 1880 it was evident that repairs to the church had become urgently necessary.  It was decided that a complete rebuild was the only solution, and Mr William Scorer, Architect of Lincoln, was engaged to plan the work.  The old church was completely demolished and the stones re-used to erect the present church on the same foundations, however as the Rector and Church Wardens had not applied for a faculty to demolish the old church and rebuild, the new church was technically a secular building requiring rededication before it could be used. This was carried out by the Bishop of Lincoln.

The interior is plain, but attractive, and includes a rather splendid organ that requires pumping.  More portable than pipe organs, these free-reed organs were widely used in smaller churches and in private homes in the 19th century, but their volume and tonal range were limited.  You can see the organ to the right of the image/s below.  The cabinet is superb with beutiful polished woodwork.  Obviously a much loved, and well used church.

Next time – the Chalk Quarry Tetford Hill, Somersby, Bag Enderby, Ashby Puerorum, and Brinkhill.

The Prime Meridian – Where East Meets West – Part 1

For some time, I’ve been thinking about a project for myself for 2019. I’d dithered with the Meridian Line, and tracing it across Lincolnshire, and a few weeks ago decided that I’d give it a go.

I’m allowing 12 months to complete the project – and the intention is to take as many interesting photographs as I can, as near to zero degrees as it is possible to get between Cleethorpes and roughly as far south as Boston.

I’ve already got OS maps for most of the county, but finally decided that I’d go further North to where the Meridian Line first makes landfall in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

So last week, a friend and I headed north, to Withernsea, and Patrington. Once the line leaves Yorkshire of course there is a small matter of the Humber Estuary getting in the way, so the next time I go out, the set of images will be from Cleethorpes.

It was a beautiful day, and after we had found the zero degrees signs we wandered along the coast road looking at the cliff collapse near the Caravan Park just outside Withernsea. The houses there are now perilously close to the edge, and the caravan park too. There was a road once, that must have traversed the cliff top, with views out to sea. It’s all gone.  The house in the background of the photo below is about 50 yards from the cliff edge, but its back garden fence is practically on the edge…..

After that, we headed South back to Withernsea itself for some lunch, and then further south again to Sunk Island (because we liked the name) – here we found Stone Creek, and by this time the sun was starting to go down.

This was just our first outing, and I’ll write more about the Meridian itself in future blog posts.

What I’m hoping long term, is that having something to work towards will help in an exploration of the County – I find it’s always good to have an excuse to go out with the camera.. this might turn out to be one of the best if this day was anything to go by.  It’s also good to have a project.

In the meantime, have a lovely Christmas – and a happy and peaceful New Year.

Thanks for taking time to read, and follow this blog – it’s been a good photographic year……

Best Wishes……