Oh for an editor!

I see many posts online about the selection of an editor for photographs.

Of course, the most popular ones are produced by Adobe, but there are plenty of others around that don’t require a monthly subscription. I suspect that for some people it’s hard to choose which one will be right for them.

I suppose it was much easier in darkroom days, when you needed the same equipment – though having said that, I bet there were long discussions around tables about which enlarger is the best, and which chemicals were going to be suitable for which sort of film.

Thing is though, that nearly every image produced will need some editing – even if it’s just to tweak the sharpening, or a bit of a crop. How many of us take an image, download it to the computer, and sit back and say “that’s it – there’s nothing to do with that – it’s perfect as it is”?

We know that photographs don’t always tell the truth, yet it seems to me that people outside the photography world always think they do…

Even as far back as 2006, Reuters dropped a Lebanese freelance photographer after it emerged that he had doctored a picture of the aftermath of an Israeli air strike on Beirut.

The news agency told photographer Adnan Hajj that it will no longer use his services after the photograph was revealed as fake by bloggers.

It showed thick black smoke rising above buildings in the Lebanese capital after an Israeli air raid in the war with the Shia Islamic group, Hizbullah.

Reuters said it “withdrew the doctored image and replaced it with the unaltered photograph after several news blogs said it had been manipulated using Photoshop software to show more smoke”.

The agency said it had “strict standards of accuracy that bar the manipulation of images” so that viewers and readers were not misled.

“The photographer has denied deliberately attempting to manipulate the image, saying that he was trying to remove dust marks and that he made mistakes due to the bad lighting conditions he was working under.”


Until people realise that photography can be both truthful, and untruthful, it becomes a reflection of the photographer him or herself.

I suspect I knew from the minute I opened photoshop for the first time, that there was plenty of opportunity to ‘edit’ images to suit myself…. and I was aware when taking images for an agency, that nothing should be changed in the photograph. We were allowed to crop out extraneous items, but the reality could not be changed…… we were only allowed to choose what went in – and what was left out of a frame.

So, here we are in lockdown 3 – maybe I’ll start with an edit of some old images, and I’ll try to make them into something that they never were – because after all, I’m not reporting any more……

Prestidigitation and the Camera

The secret to performing magic tricks is all in the hands – or at least, that’s what is suggested by the etymologies of prestidigitation and its two synonyms.  The French word preste (from Italian presto) means “quick” or “nimble,” and the Latin word digitus means “finger.” Put them together and-presto!-you’ve got prestidigitation. 

Photography can be construed as magic when the quickness of the camera and software will deceive the eye – suddenly – and ‘pfft’ – the first part is all over in 1/1000 sec.  Too slow, and your audience will see how it was done – too quick, and they won’t have time to appreciate it….

Are you seeing closely?  

Get it right, and your viewer will wonder how it was made – get it wrong, and it’s blazingly obvious, and you get called out….. are you cheating?

The clock ticks, time moves on – you press that shutter, and that second, that fraction of a second is recorded, inevitably, and can never be repeated.  The time changes, the light changes, we change.  

Tick tick, click click, we shoot – we repeat.

We sometimes see that it’s wrong, and still repeat what we do – repeating the mistakes won’t make them right and frequently we just don’t learn.

Tick tick – time’s running out people……

The studio, the landscape, the animal, it’s your theatre, and the audience is your observer.

The judges – don’t forget that all your viewers are judges – but only you can decide which of these you are going to take notice of.

There’s still that burning question – is it any good?

How did ‘that’ person get ‘that’ exhibition?

Is it art, or is it about having the nerve to keep telling the world that you are better than everyone else?

It’s magic – it’s all an illusion made from smoke and mirrors – self delusion?  Maybe…… or true art?

There’s a deception and change of reality whenever an image is framed in the viewfinder – the thing is changed as soon as that shutter button is pressed – it’s up to you whether you keep it or share it….

Magic can be about turning a horse into a zebra, creating a building that can fly, making people from the past live the present.

It’s also about self belief and worth – sticking to your guns and having no doubt that what you make is good.

Are we about winning, or being happy?  Are we seeing closely?