It’s about the Light (and the weather)

How often do you hear the phrase “I only shoot in the golden hour”, or alternately “I won’t shoot in the middle of the day”?

I’m constantly surprised by these remarks, because, if you think about it, it only leaves a few scant hours to shoot in the Winter, and it must knock at least 12 hours off your Summer schedule too.

Life goes on, and light goes on, even during the day – and at mid-day too.

I grant you that good light is great, and when it happens, and you are there – the images, you just know, are going to be amazing. The caveat is, that this great light, has to have something great on which to fall.  No subject equates to no picture.

This week, (early in February) the weather in the UK has been pretty grim.  The folks down South seem to have had the worst of it, but up here in the micro climate that is the East Coast of Lincolnshire – we didn’t get a lot of weather as such.  What we did get was a blast of freezing fog, grey sky, sleet, and as I type a smattering of snow.  ( And even as I finish that sentence – the snow stops and the sun comes out)……..

However, I digress – I had to go out – I had an appointment that I was not able to change, or postpone, I had to go.  The roads were icy (I’m three miles from the nearest main gritted road), the fog was thick and patchy, and if I hadn’t had to get out, I’d have stayed in and watched the fog!

So, when I did get the car out, I thought I’d take the camera….. just in case.  turns out it was a good thing I did.

Appointment finished about 10am, and the fog was still freezing – the car said -5 but I thought I’d head out to the coast.

First impressions were not thrilling, and the cold air took my breath away.

_DSF1966-Edit
None the less, I enjoyed the lead lines fading away into the distance.

It was heading up to 11am by the time I arrived at my next location – which I swung into on impulse.  It’s the Country park, which is usually chock full of dog walkers and joggers.  The paths were OK, but the car park itself was lethal.

The hoar frost made everything look much more beautiful, and the low light gave everything an air of peace.

_DSF1985

By changing the white balance on the camera from sunny to cloudy, it warmed the pictures up a little but still allowed for that feeling of cold.

Moving around the lake to the jetty I found that by shooting low – (this means sitting in the frosty grass by the way), I was able to get my favourite shot of the day.

_DSF1978-Edit-Edit

A tweak or two in photoshop, add a vignette, and I’m done.  It’s lunchtime.  The light is directly overhead, it would be harsh but for the fog (now lifting) – it’s revealed the textures in the icy water and in the wooden stumps.  There’s no cloud, so I’ve not shown much of the sky.

All in all, I’m glad of the appointment – I’m glad I shot in the worst part of the day – chose the wrong weather, got cold, and wet.  It was worth it.

Get out in the ‘weather’, whatever it may be.  You just don’t know what will be revealed.

Author: Diane Seddon ARPS AFIAP CPAGB BPE3* - D Seddon Photography

I am a retired freelance photographer, based in Louth, Lincolnshire.

9 thoughts on “It’s about the Light (and the weather)”

  1. Your enthusiasm is infectious! I like each of them in their own way, well done!
    As to sitting on the frosty ground, it recalled one of my own memory when I was standing in the middle of a river as deep as my wellies would allow. Having set the camera up I stooped to look through the view and “sat” in the water. I got a good shot but had to sit on a very wet seat for, the rather long, drive home. I had thought to take off my wet pants etc but thought that it would be the very time I would be stopped by a WPC.
    Keep up the blog, I really enjoy it!

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    1. Oh that made me smile…… no end…….. reminds me of a shoot I did with a girl up in the Peak District – we were trashing a wedding dress, and she sat in the river, and literally turned blue – it took two of us to pull off the boots she was wearing. Thanks for the comments…..

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    1. Thank you for joining us. I look forward to hearing from you. I shall follow your blog too. It’s interesting, the stories behind the benches.

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  2. I too have been “enjoying” the freezing fog & frost, it’s too easy to just turn the CH up and stay indoors. If nothing else, images in these conditions are “different”!
    Your images on this post illustrate the reward we get from a little effort + a lot of pain, I really like them all but the last image alone would be reward enough for a little hardship!

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    1. Thank you David. I like the last image very much. I was surprised how it turned out in the end.

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  3. Lovely pics as always, Diane. Sitting in the frosty grass? Oooh arrh! I’ve got one of those small three legged folding seat. Very light, quick to erect and gets you down low. I still love your images.

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    1. Thanks Peter – good to have you as a follower. I miss your quirky sense of humour…. 🙂

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  4. As usual your pictures are very good, the weather was very cold but there was lots to photograph, conditions not seen that often, so would have been a missed opportunity had the camera stayed at home. Well done.

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